James Madison 2017-01-28T15:04:55+00:00

JAMES MADISON’S WORLDVIEW

These four quotes of James Madison (Founding Father, known as the “Father of the Constitution”, author of many of the Federalist Papers, forth President of the United States) provide insight into his Biblical worldview – emphasis added

Fervent advocates in the cause of Christ…

“I have sometimes thought there could not be a stronger testimony in favor of religion or against temporal enjoyments, even the most rational and manly, than for men who occupy the most honorable and gainful departments and [who] are rising in reputation and wealth, publicly to declare their unsatisfactoriness by becoming fervent advocates in the cause of Christ; and I wish you may give in your evidence in this way.”

Letter to William Bradford, September 25, 1773

Allegiance to the Universal Sovereign…

“Before any man can be considered as a member of Civil Society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governor of the Universe: And if a member of Civil Society, who enters into any subordinate Association, must always do it with a reservation of his duty to the General Authority; much more must every man who becomes a member of any particular Civil Society, do it with a saving of his allegiance to the Universal Sovereign.”

Memorial and Remonstrance against Religious Assessments, June 1785

Finger of the Almighty hand which has been so frequently…

“The real wonder is that so many difficulties should have been surmounted … with a unanimity almost as unprecedented as it must have been unexpected. It is impossible for any man of candor to reflect on this circumstance without partaking of the astonishment. It is impossible for the man of pious reflection not to perceive in it a finger of the Almighty hand which has been so frequently and signally extended to our relief in the critical stages of the revolution.”

Federalist Papers #37, January 1788.

The rights of religion

“I must admit moreover that it may not be easy, in every possible case, to trace the line of separation between the rights of religion and the Civil authority with such distinctness as to avoid collisions and doubts on unessential points.  The tendency to a usurpation on one side or the other, or to a corrupting coalition or alliance between them, will be best guarded against by an entire abstinance of the Government from interference in any way whatever, beyond the necessity of preserving public order, and protecting each sect against trespasses on its legal rights by others.”

Letter to Rev. Jasper Adams, 1832